Philipp Neubauer, PhD

Philipp is a fisheries scientist who uses statistical analysis to inform actions that promote sustainable fisheries.

Globally, the two most comprehensive threats to marine life are overfishing and climate change. Funded by a 2014 Royal Society of New Zealand Marsden Fast-Start grant, Philipp is using size-based models to research the combined effects of these threats on fished ecosystems around the world. He is using Bayesian statistical modelling to manage the uncertainties inherent in such complex systems and is passionate about making these powerful research tools readily available to the research community.

Philipp’s previous work, published in Science, showed that most fisheries bounce back when fishing is reduced to sustainable levels. With appropriate management, fisheries worldwide can be resilient and sustainable.

After growing up in central Germany, Philipp moved to seaside Marseille to study for a Masters in ecological modeling at the Université de la Méditerranée. He completed a PhD in quantitative ecology at Victoria University of Wellington, followed by a post-doc at Rutgers University, studying the patterns and drivers of decline and recovery in fish stocks. He joined Dragonfly in 2013.

The impact of fishing on our marine environment is massive – from gathering shellfish at the beach to trawling the ocean depths – you cannot escape it. Robust information from fisheries science offers a way to balance conservation issues with the need to feed the world’s population.

Selected publications

Neubauer, P., Abraham, E., Knox, C., & Richard, Y. (2014). Assessing the performance of pāua (Haliotis iris) fisheries using GPS logger data. Final Research Report for Ministry for Primary Industries project PAU2011-03 (Unpublished report held by Ministry for Primary Industries, Wellington).